Pierce Pioneer

 

 

This one goes out to all the fathers out there. I know it’s not easy, I’ve seen my dad struggle with the best of them. I wasn’t always appreciative as I should be to my dad, but as time goes on I realize how much he sacrificed. It took time, but I realized sometimes showing appreciation comes in the form of just growing up and trying to shoulder the same burden our dads did. That journey of self-growth, becomes the catalyst to the only on-going relationship some of us will have with our dads.

I never had a great relationship with my dad. He provided for me, I never went hungry or cold, and he told me stories. But talking with him wasn’t a normal thing by any means. The relationship I have with my dad is non-verbal, and the ways in which I grow to be like him are from the non-verbal parts of myself that not only learned from him but came from him.

Whether gift or a curse, fathers hold a major part in our lives, something I intend to continue to set further out on my life to understand.

Tacoma Mural Project

Tacoma is a city with a vibrant art scene, from its Art Museum and Glass Museum, to its Musical Playhouse, and the dozens of family owned boutiques and jewelry stores in between. Still, some of the most prominent pieces of Tacoma’s local art (as well as history) comes from its colorful murals decorating downtown Tacoma. 

The murals in Tacoma mix culture, advocacy, and tradition into art and with the help of Downtown on the Go and Spaceworks Tacoma, the legacies and meanings of these murals can be explored and discussed via a virtual 1.1 mail tour.

The first mural the tour shows you is titled Working Forward Weaving Anew, and according to the guides this mural “is designed to honor cultural traditions, the natural environment, and our need for new harmonious and sustainable paths into the future.” Painted by Esteban Camacho and Jessilyn Brinkerhoff with the help of a team of nine Native American artists, this mural was handpainted in only 6 weeks and is part of the Prairie Line Trail Project and reminds us to respect the land we share with others and nurture those relationships. 

A recent mural that was shown during this tour was a solo painting done by Tiffany Hammonds in honor of the 2020 protests, this mural isn’t painted directly on the storefronts and instead was painted on the boards during the protests in response to the death of George Floyd and the ongoing police brutality. In an interview with Chase Hutchinson of the News Tribune, Hammonds talks about the message behind this piece. 

“The message is hope,” says Hammonds. “If it’s our vision, that means we are capable of doing it.”

A more diverse twist on the usual painted murals on the tour was one done by David Long and Al Pikart who took screenshot images from webcam chats and turned them into an art piece drawing attention to the mistreatment of people detained at the NW ICE Processing Center. The words “Queremos Libertad” translates to “We want Freedom” and pushes Long and Pikart’s message that no human should be treated illegally. 

The final mural shown on the tour was a beautiful tribute to the late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. The artist, Nori Kimura painted this mural with four of his middle school students as he said it would be more meaningful to him. It was RBG’s work for equal rights, activism for women, people of color, and members of the LGBTQ+ community that inspired Kimura to paint this mural as a tribute to her work and legacy as an advocate and activist.

My takeaway from this tour was that our state is steeped in history and culture and although it may not always be pleasant we must remember it and keep it with us, for me, the art displayed on this tour is a reminder to embrace who we are, who we live with, and where we come from so that we might pave the way towards a better future.


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fort Steilacoom Park: A Wildlife Habitat and Peaceful Sanctuary for Visitors

While the birds sing over the lake, children laugh on the castle and dogs run in the fields, the sound of life reverberates throughout Fort Steilacoom Park.

The park is a peaceful place for visitors to attend, attracting regulars and newcomers from as far as Seattle, Graham and Olympia to its scenic landscape. From the nature trails around Lake Waughop to the dog park and the playground, these areas were most traveled on a sunny Monday afternoon.

Young children play on the castle while parents watch from the grass and benches.
Young children play on the castle while parents watch from the grass and benches. (Photo credit: Elissa Blankenship)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It’s not the attractions that make the park special; it’s the community and gatherings that take place near the picnic shelter. One family mentioned that in the past their reunion was held at the park by the playground, creating a family-friendly atmosphere. The nearby soccer and baseball fields are home to sporty children and after-school teams.

The park features historical barns, a cemetery and Hill Ward, the old housing for patients of Western State Hospital, which you can learn more about in Kyla Raygor’s podcast, "The Roots of Fort Steilacoom". When driving by these areas to the heart of the park, you feel the history within the park’s peaceful environment.

The nature trails are filled with wildlife, songbirds sitting in trees and Canadian geese nesting in the bramble, hatching their eggs into goslings that grow to explore the lake. Along the paved path, fishing docks extend over the water, with shallow gravel beaches for dogs to splash around.

Canadian geese sunbathe with their goslings on the lakeside path.
Canadian geese sunbathe with their goslings on the lakeside path. (Photo Credit: Elissa Blankenship)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Canines of all breeds and ages are welcome at the off-leash park, understanding that the animal isn’t aggressive toward humans or other pets. The dog park is separated into three sections, depending on the dog’s size. The dog park stretches for 22 acres, giving owners room to be comfortable while their dogs wrestle and fetch balls. 

Inside the biggest section, handlers can teach their dogs simple agility commands on a small beginner’s course. The equipment shows evidence of weathering and needs to be replaced, but dog owners make do with the available obstacles and practice obeying commands.

Dog owners practicing with their puppies on the small agility course.
Dog owners practicing with their puppies on the small agility course. (Photo Credit: Elissa Blankenship)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

While visiting Fort Steilacoom Park, I brought Fenrir, my five-month-old Karelian Bear Dog. He ran around with his four-legged friends, trampled through the shallow water at the lake and amplified my experience as a loyal companion. On our adventure throughout the land, his body language alerted me to every person, sound and animal I might’ve missed without him.

Other parts of the park, like the designated flying zone for drones or motorized airplanes, allow visitors to practice their piloting skills. Unpaved trails with bicycle jumps in the grasslands allow trail goers to take a step into nature, without the windy mountainous roads and travel time to most Washington hikes.

The park is at 8714 87th Ave. S.W. in Lakewood, with a 40-minute drive to the Pierce College Puyallup campus and five minutes to Pierce College Fort Steilacoom. Whether you’re planning to visit the lake, fields or dog park, don’t miss the natural scenery and opportunity to socialize with welcoming visitors.


Fort Steilacoom Park Map


Waughop Lake

Originally called Mud Lake, this body of water was renamed to Waughop Lake after John Waughop, a Western State Hospital Superintendent from 1880 to 1897. When farming became prominent at the facility, workers would pump nutrient-rich silt from the lake onto nearby crop fields.

The Lake Waughop Trail has one mile of wide walking paths that circle the lake. (Elissa Blankenship)
Pierce College Fort Steilacoom overlooks Lake Waughop and Fort Steilacoom Park. (Elissa Blankenship)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Hill Ward Memorial

The Hill Ward dormitory, also referred to as the White House, was constructed in 1932 to provide additional housing to hospital patients who worked on the farm. As the building became vacant when the farm shut down in 1965, it was later demolished and the ruins were used to train search and rescue responders. From 2007 to 2009, Hill Ward was restored to pay respect to those who lived and worked there, according to a discovery trail sign.

Trail sign showing the Hill Ward building before demolition. (City of Lakewood)
The Hill Ward memorial after construction.
The history of the park, dating back to 1871, is inscribed in reclaimed Hill Ward building stone.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


The Barns

A farm was established at Western State Hospital in 1871 to provide food for patients in response to state funding decreasing. As the farm expanded to nearly 200 acres in the early 1900s, the barns were built to aid with general farm operations and to house livestock, like cows, chickens and turkeys. Later, medical advancements reduced the number of patients and the time they stayed at the hospital causing the farm to shut down in 1965.

The red barn was one of the barns that helped the farm become self-sufficient. (Jayden Fenske)
Referred to as “The Blue Barn” on one of the trail signs. (Jayden Fenske)
The largest barn, located adjacent to the other barns, was used to aid in farm operations.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Western State Hospital Memorial Cemetery

During the time the cemetery was open from 1876 to 1952, over 3000 patients were buried in graves marked by numbered stones. As the small grave markers became covered in grass, local community members founded the Grave Concern Association who continue to replace the numbered stones with traditional tombstones. 

Patient burial map displayed outside of Western State Hospital Memorial Cemetery. (Jayden Fenske)
Historical monument marking the cemetery along the main path. (Jayden Fenske)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Fort Steilacoom Dog Park

The dog park, which opened in 2006, has been named “the best dog park” by various local news stations, like King 5’s Evening Magazine and the South Sound Magazine. This park offers 22 acres of fenced fields and a designated section for small dogs. 

The off leash dog park offers large gated fields for dogs to play in.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Pierce College Fort Steilacoom Campus

Opened in 1967, Pierce College Fort Steilacoom, originally called Clover Park Community College, held its classes in a former Albertsons building and at various Pierce County high schools. The next year, an official campus was founded alongside Fort Steilacoom Park. Lake Waughop can be viewed and accessed from a paved trail on campus. 

The Cascade building, opened in 1972, was the first building at Fort Steilacoom. (Jayden Fenske)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Join reporters Celine Paez, Jayden Fenske and videographer Kyla Raygor as they interview visitors at the park.

Late Nite Take Out Ep. 4 – A Talk About Music, Culture & Life w/ Joshua Riley

 

Episode Description:

In this special hour-long episode of Late Nite Take Out, my friend, music journalist, & fellow music lover Josh comes on the show to share his thoughts & have a conversation with me about Music Culture. It was an absolute blast making this episode with him! I got to find out how well-spoken and intelligent my friend is and truly connect over culture. During our conversation, we cover a variety of topics, such as black celebration, cultural appropriation, racism, trends, predictions, & the current state of music. But not only that, but we also just chop it up about life.

My favorite parts of the conversation are where Josh talks about when he feels most represented in music, & when he and I talk about feeling “othered” by music. We don’t hold back! And, get as honest as we can be. I got to talk about how I relate to music as an Asian American man, too. That felt particularly great.
On that topic, Is black music made only for black people? What is the responsibility of the listener, and artist, when taking part in a culture that is not theirs? All things we talk about in this episode.

Timestamps

1 – 14min.
Introductions, Black Celebration, Cultural Appropriation

14 – 30min.
When Josh felt most represented in Music, artists who push the boundaries, & who is music made for?

46 – 58min.
Daniel talks about feeling “othered” in Music

58 – 64min.
Josh closes up the show!

Late Nite Take Out Ep. 3 – Stop AAPI Hate

Episode Description:

In this episode, I reach out to you as the son of two immigrant parents. They both lived through great hardship to immigrate here to America. If I could ask both of them right now what they thought, I imagined they would be surprised, but feel they shouldn’t be, to hear the narrative that the “kung flu” virus is a result of immigration. I share the stories of their immigration in hopes to humanize their story.

 

Many immigrate in the hopes of a better opportunity at life, usually without many prospects left for them or their families at home. I imagine many, like my parents, were confronted with racism after their immigration, only adding to the weight of the journey. In some ways, the recent attacks on Asian Americans aren’t new. The same hate, a different day. In this episode, I recount about times my family faced opposition they could not understand in contrast with their want for a better life. Often, they would try to turn the other cheek.

 

The rise in violent attacks on Asian Americans reflects a very real fear. The fear of helplessness, the same feeling many victims of racism feel. In these times, we must remember to speak out and that just being happy to be here is not enough. Love yours, watch over them, and stay safe y’all.

Late Nite Take Out – CPTSD Symptoms + Treatment Story

Episode Description:

This episode covers how the symptoms of CPTSD have affected me over the years. For much of my life, I have gone un-diagnosed, many of the symptoms of CPTSD can fly by under your radar. I hope to share my journey in a way that can helpfully inform or relate to the struggles many of us go through with our emotions and anxieties. Many of the symptoms of CPTSD align with the everyday struggles of life. After much deliberation, I found a therapist and began analyzing and making sense of some of my traumas throughout my life. It can be surprising to learn how interconnected our memories, experiences and emotions are. The process of healing can be a daunting one, but worthwhile in its returns. I share my steps through therapy to help destigmatize the help we need sometimes. Therapy can be a powerful tool to self-discovery and healing, with the will to use it. Peace, and much love to everyone out there, especially now. Each other and the feelings we share is all we can hold onto sometimes.

Kicking it with Q – Quintin’s Anime List

Quintin discusses anime.

Editor: Quintin Mattson-Hayward

Logo: Jesus Contreras

Kicking it with Q – Week 2 and 3 of Quarantine

Quintin talks about his second and third week in Quarantine, and how he feels.

Editor: Quintin Mattson-Hayward

Logo: Jesus Contreras

Kickin it with Q – Bloodshot movie review

Quintin gives a review of Bloodshot.

Editor: Quintin Mattson-Hayward

Logo: Jesus Contreras

The Drop – Episode 6 – Elizabeth Warren in Seattle

Daniel So brings the listener to Seattle event with Elizabeth Warren.

 

Host: Daniel So

Editor: Daniel So, Kotone Ochiai

Photographer: Desirae Garcia

Kicking it with Q – First Week of Quarantine (The Quest for Guitar Hero)

Quintin tells his first-week quarantine experience and his quest to play Guitar Hero.

Host: Quintin Mattson-Howard

Editor: Quintin Mattson-Howard

Logo: Jesus Contreras

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