Pierce Pioneer

Weird Places in Washington

As summer draws near, many students may be wondering how to enjoy their summer break. Thankfully, Washington state is full of all sorts of odd places ripe for exploring. So whether you’re looking to take an in-state trip during the summer or you’re just looking to add to your bucket list, check out some of Washington’s weirdest places.

Lyn Topinka – Courtesy Photo
  1. The Twin Sisters, Touchet.

If you’re a fan of local hiking as well as bizarre, natural scenery, then the Twin Sisters Rock in Touchet is the place. These stone pillars are the remnants of the last ice age over 12,000-15,000 years ago, and the erosion of a giant flood carved out these pillars. The natives of Walla Walla, however, have a local legend for their origins. 

 

“Coyote fell in love with three sisters who were catching salmon in the river. A notorious trickster, Coyote watched the sisters by day and destroyed their traps by night. After several days Coyote saw the sisters crying because they were starving for fish. He promised to build them a new trap if they would become his wives. The sisters consented and Coyote kept his promise. For many years they lived happily, but after a while, he became jealous of them. Using his powers, Coyote turned two of the sisters into stone pillars, and the third one into a cave downriver. He then turned himself into a rock so he could watch over them forever,” wrote Jamie Hale, a former hiker of this trail and a writer for The Oregonian

Welcome to Monte Cristo
Juliestge – Courtesy Photo

2. Monte Cristo Ghost Town, Snohomish.

We share our state with a vast expanse of wilderness and land steeped with history, so it’s no surprise there’s a town or two that’s been lost to time. Ghost Towns of Washington explains that Monte Cristo was once a bustling mining town in the late 1800s, but by 1920 the mines had dried up and the town was abandoned. Visitors can find remnants of the town’s heyday lying about, including old welcome signs, broken railways and homes now turned into shacks after years of disrepair. 

Carol M. Highsmith – Courtesy Photo

3. The Fremont Troll, Seattle

While this journey is a little closer to home, you may be surprised to find this hulking beast lingering beneath the Aurora Bridge in Fremont. Artists Steve Badanes, Will Martin, Donna Walter and Ross Whitehead created this 5.5 meter sculpture in 1990. The concrete and wire troll holds a Volkswagen Beetle in its hand, almost as if it snatched the car from the highway above. 

Photo via Seattle Pinball Museum

4. Seattle Pinball Museum, Seattle.

The Seattle Pinball Museum isn’t exactly a niche oddity, but it’s a place that’s perfect for kids, old school arcade fans and of course, pinball connoisseurs. The Seattle Pinball Museum boasts a wide array of pinball machines from all the way back to the 1930s and they aren’t just for show either, for a $15 admission fee you can play all you want.

Kyla Raygor

5. Hobbit Hut, Port Orchard.

Here’s a destination for botanists and fantasy fans alike. Located right behind the Brother’s Greenhouse in Port Orchard, this “Lord of the Rings” inspired Hobbit House can be ventured inside and comes complete with a working stone fireplace and circular doors and windows.

The Theme of Wolfwalkers

WOLFWALKERS Q&A | TIFF 2020 – https://youtu.be/rjp9BJ9Ht5c

The Hobbit – An Unexpected Journey – Old Friends [Extended] (Part 2) – https://youtu.be/nn3nA-0Au9U

How To Train Your Dragon: “This is Berk” Scene 4K HD – https://youtu.be/Yk52kI87-VI

 

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Surprises of Cinco De Mayo

Cinco de Mayo is a day that is known for celebrating Mexican pride with parades, friends, parties, family gatherings and most of all tequila.

Cinco de Mayo, or the fifth of May, has become a well-known holiday in the United States and has been celebrated in Mexico since 1863. In an effort to raise awareness and educate about this festive holiday, here are 5 Things you may not have known about Cinco de Mayo.

It’s not Mexican Independence Day

Mexico had declared their independence on Sep. 16, 1810 and this marked the beginning of hostilities against the rule of the Spanish government.

Celebrates the Battle of Puebla

The Battle of Puebla is known as a great victory over 6,000 French soldiers on May 5, 1862. Benito Juárez, president of Mexico rounded up about 2,000 troops made up of indigenous Mexicans or of mixed ancestry to face the assault by the French. Mexico was led in the battle by General Ignacio Zaragoza from Texas and lasted from daybreak to that evening and the effort by the Mexicans was able to drive off the French. Immediately after, the victory was declared a celebration.

Mexico Celebrates Cinco de Mayo

In Mexico, Cinco de Mayo is observed by the state of Puebla where the Battle of Puebla took place. Although they are not the only state to put on a celebration, for most of Mexico May 5 is a day like any other and is not considered a federal holiday so banks and stores stay open. For those that celebrate, some traditions include military parades, reenactment of the Battle of Puebla and other festive events.

Why does the United States celebrate Cinco de Mayo?   

The United States celebrates Mexican culture and heritage on May 5, mostly in parts where the Mexican American population is great. In the 1960’s some Chicano activists brought awareness of the holiday due to their observance of the Battle of Puebla. Today, most who celebrate do so with mariachi music, Mexican folk dancing and traditional Mexican foods like the beloved tacos. Los Angeles, Chicago and Houston are cities which hold some of the largest festivals that mark the occasion and there are still others that will celebrate with chihuahua races like in Chandler, Arizona.

Why Tequila on Cinco de Mayo?

On May 5, 47% of drink orders are margaritas compared to the rest of the year with 23% and tequila sales double leading up to the celebration of the holiday. However, tequila was not always so easily accessible. From 1000 B.C.-200A.D. the Aztecs fermented a drink called pulque which was made from the sap of the agave plant. The drink was important to the Aztecs and they worshiped Mayahuel the goddess of maguey and her husband the Patecatl the god of pulque. When the Spanish arrived and met the Aztecs they discovered pulque and the drink started to catch on. Since then, tequila has taken its time in becoming what we know today and had been handled by the Spanish who were distilling agave in the 1400’s-1600’s. In 1758 the Cuervo family started to commercially distill their own tequila followed by the Sauza family in 1873. Don Cenobio Sauza identified blue agave as the best for making tequila and this is where the tequila known today started to be produced. The Margarita was later invented in 1936 by an Irishman called Madden who ran a bar in Tijuana and called the drink Tequila Daisy (daisy in Spanish is margarita). It was not until 1974 that tequila became the intellectual property of Mexico.

Being Mexican or not, Cinco de Mayo is a day which celebrates Mexican culture altogether and is known for friends, family and good fun. This year the holiday may look a little different, but a celebration of the Mexican culture will never die.

Dogecoin: The Joke Worth Almost $50 Billion

What is Bitcoin and how to get your hands on it?

 

What started as a joke has now turned into a worldwide asset valued at almost $50 billion. 

The cryptocurrency Dogecoin has gained national attention for its massive gains of more than 6000% this year alone. According to CoinMarketCap, Dogecoin rose from less than a penny to over 25 cents. For being so cheap, Dogecoin is something that almost anyone can get their hands on.

 

How did it start?

such wallet, very blockchain, good boi
An example of the Doge internet meme.

In 2013, software engineers Billy Marcus and Jackson Palmer created a cryptocurrency as a tribute to the popular “doge” meme that year. The meme purposely misspelled the word dog to describe the Shiba Inu character that is the face of the cryptocurrency. Since then, the cryptocurrency has remained cheap but has gained support and usage through Reddit by tipping artists and meme accounts.

 

Who is involved?

The most predominant figure to push for the investment in Dogecoin has been Tesla CEO Elon Musk. With over 50 million followers on Twitter, Musk continued to tweet sometimes cryptic and subtle messages in his support for the cryptocurrency. Since his involvement in 2021, the value of Dogecoin has skyrocketed.

Dogecoin is the people's crypto
A tweet from Elon Musk advocating Dogecoin.

Additionally, Dogecoin has seen a push due to the involvement of the cult status Reddit group WallStreetBets. This group was most recently responsible for the push against Wall Street hedge funds over GameStop and AMC stock that made big money investors lose billions. The internet messaging board has remained a stronghold for organized investing and rises in quirky companies like Dogecoin.  

 

How does it work?

Similar to Bitcoin, Dogecoin runs on a blockchain system that is a secure digital archive that records transactions. This secure ledger provides copies of the transactions for all to see which acts as a proof of work system.

People known as “miners” must use high-powered computers to solve complex math equations that add to the blockchain and process transactions. For completing these math equations, the answer is then confirmed by other miners and the correct miner receives Dogecoin in return to sell or keep. Very few people can access these computers as they are expensive and require an immense amount of electricity.

 

How does Bitcoin compare?

Dogecoin is often compared to the popular cryptocurrency Bitcoin, which has exploded in value since its creation in 2009. Bitcoin started at only more than a few cents but has now peaked over $50,000 per share in 2021. Both are digital currencies but have a few significant differences.

The first is the fact that Dogecoin doesn’t have a set amount of coins to max out at. Bitcoin has a lifetime cap of 21 million coins, which means that miners will have to work longer and harder to add to the currency’s blockchain. 

On the other hand, Dogecoin doesn’t have a lifetime cap and the market sees an average of 5 billion coins issued every year. Making it harder to crack open more Bitcoin has added to its value gain, while Dogecoin has seen a minuscule increase in comparison.

Furthermore, it is easier to add to Dogecoins blockchain than it is for Bitcoin. Comparatively, according to Forbes, it takes around 10 minutes to confirm a transaction and add to the blockchain, while only taking one minute on the Dogecoin blockchain. This adds to the number of Dogecoins available and makes transactions significantly easier than its crypto competitor. 

 

Where can you buy it?

To buy direct Dogecoin, crypto exchanges such as Binance or Kraken provide the opportunity to do so. With the usage of a debit or credit card, you can directly purchase Dogecoin and set up an account to house your funds. From there it is advised to move your coins into a crypto wallet that protects against hacks and is transported to your smartphone. Other than buying direct Dogecoin, some online brokers such as Robinhood or E-Trade sell Dogecoin and treat your investment like stocks.

Those who joined the Dogecoin craze in 2021 have seen significant gains, but the risk in investing in cryptocurrency is still high. Compared to other cryptocurrencies such as Bitcoin or Ethereum, Dogecoin has the threat of major inflation and lack of maximization. Yet the reward may outweigh the risk as many are getting their hands on a meme dog currency that has attracted the support from billionaires to college kids. It’s not too late to take a chance to get involved in the crypto-craze that has risen to fame.

Tacoma Public Library and Seattle Public Library announce a reciprocal borrowing agreement

On March 29, 2021, Tacoma Public Library and Seattle Public Library announced they would have a reciprocal borrowing agreement. People who have a library card with TPL and a government issued ID can now get one with SPL. 

 

According to SPL’s library card FAQ, previous availability went only to people who lived, worked, went to school or owned property in Bothell or King County. Other libraries made reciprocal borrowing agreements with SPL in the past, and now TPL is added to that list. 

 

Applications for an SPL card are available at any SPL branch or online at their website. Once approved, readers can check out and put up to 25 e-books and e-audiobooks on hold, as well as 50 physical items on hold. Physical items on hold must be picked up at a SPL branch. This process is the same for SPL patrons getting a TPL card as well. According to both libraries, they are not charging overdue fees—only fees for lost or damaged material. 

 

Most TPL are still closed due to COVID-19 restrictions. However, there is hope for people who miss the calm environment of the library. “Fern Hill Library and Swasey Library are now open for visits by appointment or walk-in,” TPL stated. TPL Now updates regularly on the availability of services being offered at TPL. 

 

This is a wonderful partnership, and people should take advantage of this wider access to library catalog as more libraries continue to open up.

COVID-19 Self-Test Kits available at local libraries

On April 14, 2021, Tacoma Public Library and Tacoma-Pierce County Health Department partnered up to offer free self-administered COVID-19 test kits, with library cards not being required. The kits can be picked up at any TPL location during their service hours, or by speaking with a librarian at one of their branches; it is unclear if the Eastside Community Center is included.

Afterwards, the kit can be registered online using the included instructions. Once that is complete and the test has been administered, the kit can be dropped off at a UPS store or UPS drop box. Postage has been included since it is required that the kit be mailed to UPS the same day it is taken. TPL advises those interested to not bring kits back to the library after picking one up.

This is a great way to give people more flexibility and privacy while also being safe. For more information regarding TPL’s pickup services and schedules, visit TPL’s Events calendar.

Godzilla vs. King Kong Review: An Appreciative Look

Slight Spoilers Ahead


We have had “The Thrilla in Manila,” “The Rumble in the Jungle,” “The Brawl in Montreal” and now we have what I’m calling “King of Titans” in “Godzilla vs Kong”!

The fourth installment in the MonsterVerse franchise directed by Adam Wingard packs a titanically large punch (pun intended) when these two giant monsters collide to see who bows to who. Whether you are a fan of Godzilla or Kong entering this film for the first time does not matter. The film will leave you wanting more of each respected titan and will bring a new level of appreciation for them.

From the opening credits of the film the viewer can see the breakdown of the monsterverse, and each fight leading up to Godzilla and Kong facing off for the first time in the franchise. Godzilla is not new to brawling with various other monsters with unique abilities and strengths, but he soon finds out Kong is in a different class all his own.

The experience of such a monumental fight was very nostalgic for me. I can remember being 10-12 years old and loving to see monsters clash with one another. I remember not being able to decide which was my favorite of all the creatures ever imagined, but my top two were definitely Godzilla and Kong.

Before viewing the film, I admit to not having any expectations for it being more than another monster film. That quickly turned once Godzilla was on the screen. 

Even if you have seen the previous movies from the monsterverse, there is something about Godzilla that draws the kid out of you. Seeing him makes you remember his classic roar and his dragon breath and gives you the feeling that Kong will have no chance in this fight since he is known more for defeating titans.

Our favorite titans have to share screen time in this one and could not hog all the glory from the film even though they are the main event. The cast was well rounded but did not give enough of a lift to the film to make it a perfect monster movie.

The classic conspiracy theorists join together to provide some comical relief between what everyone tuned into watch. The film did have a classic villain plotting some secret scheme for the world. Although considering monsters were destroying cities with their earth-shattering fights, I cannot say I blame him for trying to find a way to overpower them and put humanity on top again.

Sadly, this is one thing in the movie I could have done without. I caught myself thinking many times through the film that I could do without the people in it. Unfortunately, that would only make it a 40-minute movie and not a full-length feature.

The story that was built around the fight was a sci-fi adventure which had holes with no explanations. I do want to be fair and say that perfect science was not the main focus and dealing with sci-fi is not always the easiest thing. Still the ideas for the origins of the titans was given a good effort.

Overall the film is worth watching due to its epic battle scenes. The movie moves from fight to fight like a boxing event. Each fight is a round on its own and you can never really tell who will win in the end. You could say you have ringside seats to one of the most action-packed fights of all time. You will find yourself cheering for both combatants and not wanting either to lose because of the heart they both show. 

The student media teams are searching for creative co-workers.

It’s great opportunity for someone looking for part-time employment within the college that offers a flexible schedule. Students who work for the media teams will bring new voices to publications to give us fresh perspectives.

This is a work-from-home opportunity until campus reopens.

  • Starting pay: $13.94/hr
  • Starting hours: 10-15hrs/week

Positions begin in late August and will continue throughout the 2021-22 school year.

Positions Available:

Editor-in-Chief: The student in charge of the content and reputation of the publication.
Managing Editor: The second in charge who connects with the editor-in-chief and the team members.
Reporter: The students who research, interview, and write stories.
Photographer: The students who take photos.
Videographer: The students who create videos appropriate for the college audience.
Podcaster: The students who create podcasts appropriate for the college audience.

Requirements:

Team members need to take 10 credits each quarter from fall to spring and maintain a 2.7 grade point average.

Contact adviser Teresa Josten at [email protected] for more information or detailed job position descriptions.

APPLICATIONS DUE FRIDAY, MAY 7.
APPLY TODAY.

Students and professors share their experiences switching from in-person classrooms to fully virtual learning one year after the fact

On March 16, 2020 Pierce College closed its campuses to students following the sudden uprising of COVID-19 cases in Washington State. One year later, Pierce College has proceeded to do its teaching virtually. 

Announcements to continue in person teaching have since been extended to a small number of classes for Fall 2021. As Pierce prepares to bring students back to campus step by step, and other campuses and school districts begin to open their doors, many students and staff at Pierce feel as though the overall transition from being in person to fully online was mostly successful. 

While some issues regarding communication and overall engagement brought mixed feelings for some, the general consensus seemed positive, with part of this being due to the accommodations made by professors. For Jade Dickinson, writing tutor and Running Start senior, she’s felt that Pierce College has done the best they could do, given the circumstances.

“Pierce and its professors have a strong commitment to quality,” Dickinson said. “I find that I have still been learning in my online classes and that most of the professors that I’ve come across have been really understanding. [However] I know that’s not the case for every professor.”

Dickinson can recall earlier March of 2020 when Pierce first closed its campuses and transitioned to online learning. “At the beginning of the pandemic, everybody was really really confused—including Pierce,” Dickinson said. 

“I remember, we actually went online four days before classes ended and I had to do my last week of classes online. I think there was just so much fear around what could happen and we didn’t know anything about the virus. We barely knew how it spread, and we didn’t even have a mask mandate at that point.”

Mika Asiag, another Running Start student, also thought Pierce handled it well but felt that not everyone likes online learning and would have preferred other methods instead of fully online classes.

“I think they honestly could have done hybrid,” Asiag said. “I just feel like not everyone likes online learning—especially me. I hate online learning, and it’s hard for me to grasp ideas when [I] have to learn on [my] own.”

Students were not the only ones affected by the switch to online. For math professor Claire Gibbons, Ph.D., she’s been trying to view the whole ordeal in a positive light, not just for herself, but for those around her as well. “I think if I have the privilege, that I need to be using that to make a good situation out of this,” Gibbons said.

“If I’m just kind of feeling bad for myself—when I actually have so much—I don’t think that is the right way to handle it. The empathy that I can feel for my coworkers who are going through this I can try to share with my students, because my students also might have things going on at home—they might have kids, they might have jobs. I have lots of stuff that’s been impacted,so to be warm and understanding of that is good I think.”

Gibbons shared how a small disconnect between admin and higher-ups and the actual experience of faculty in their classes felt present at times. Overall though, Gibbons is grateful that Pierce was able to provide the needed support for this transition. “I think that [the higher-ups have] done a lot, especially with transparent communication and trying to be as supportive as possible; so I’ve been overall really impressed, personally.”

For math professor Cody Fouts, this was his first time having to teach full time online. Fouts had to adapt his class to online, as he’s been attempting to find different methods of teaching that may help his future students.

“I actually, prior to the beginning of the pandemic, had no desire to teach online because I think that one of my strengths as an educator and a teacher is in-person interactions with students, and I thought that was gonna be really hard to replicate online—, which has been true,” Fouts said.

For Fouts, getting students to register to the proper locations for his class, such as WAMAP, proved to be a small issue, as Pierce’s primary work-space for students is Canvas. But one thing in particular that has been difficult for Fouts has been interpersonal relationships with students and being available to his students while juggling his schedule.

“I think one of my biggest struggles as an educator—online or not—is trying to meet all students where they’re at, but I also want to keep myself in mind,” Fouts said. “I have things that I want to do in the evenings and weekends too that are not work. And it’s not that I don’t care about my students; I just only have so much time during the week.”

For Dickinson, she felt as though the school should do more to make their basic information more visible to students. Dickinson further said how she thinks sometimes info needs to be shoved in peoples’ faces.

“I think they’re doing a great job and making the right decisions personally, but just remind students through email [and] Canvas when tuition is due, when registration starts and any other important dates they should know about instead of relying on the students themselves to look in the handbook or look in the calendar,” Dickinson said.

For Fouts, what he felt could have been done differently had less to do with Pierce and more to do with himself personally. “I don’t know [if] I would have been as optimistic that things were going to be as short lived as they were,” Fouts said.

“I also would have really sought out more resources for how to effectively facilitate an online course. I think again during those first initial quarters, [it] was in my mind [that] all this was still very temporary, so I was still trying to do a very similar version of what I do in person; I was trying to do that online.”

Pierce has been trying their best given the situation. A year ago they were scrambling to move everything online as soon as they could. Some people understandably disliked online learning; others have tried to make the best of it despite the isolation. One thing Fouts misses most about in-person learning includes the simple “good mornings” and the relationships that could be built from getting to know students personally. 

 

“You just know that when you’re seeing someone every day or even every couple of days you get to know things about their lives,” Fouts said. “You know maybe their families or things they’re looking forward to, or even just why students are in school, and then [you’re] able to ask them about that,” Fouts said.

 

“I am really goofy and silly in the way that I teach generally and so I really miss being able to do that every day with my students and see the look on their faces when they roll their eyes at my stupid math and dad jokes.”

Pierce has been in quarantine for over a year now with signs of returning to campus in Fall 2021. If there’s anything the pandemic has taught us, it’s to not take things for granted and the importance of compassion. 

Reach out to people; no one is above burnout. Find little things to be grateful for—they exist everywhere. Be proud for making it an entire year.

Could Washington survive the same storm that hit Texas?

Starting on Feb. 10 through 20, Texas experienced widespread blackouts after a record storm hit the state. Over 3 million people were without power and hundreds of thousands more were without drinkable water. This sparked a statewide emergency that claimed the lives of 40 people many of which from carbon monoxide poisoning or hypothermia when conditions reached 0 degrees fahrenheit.

The state’s energy sector froze over and left equipment and power resources unusable, in what was deemed a generational storm. Many Republican lawmakers pointed to the ineffectiveness of renewable energy and criticized the wind turbines that froze. It took over a week in Texas and its surrounding states to restore power for millions of people.

If Washington state was to see a similar record freeze like Texas did last February, the state could rely on its usage of hydroelectricity to power residents. This provides a renewable energy source that is carbon neutral compared to Texas who relies on fossil fuels.

According to Power Magazine, hydroelectric plants are less susceptible to freezing due to the depth of water taken in by pipes leading into the plant that remain above freezing temperatures. This allows hydroelectric plants to run year round and in colder climates around the world in places such as Norway, Russia, Iceland, and Canada. 

Hydroelectricity makes up 62% of Washington’s energy production, while Texas’ largest energy source is natural gas making up 52% according to the U.S. Energy Information Association. Texas’ largest energy source was limited due to icy conditions and freezing temperatures. If Washington saw the same conditions, the state would see a far better outcome due to the reliability of its natural water sources.

Texas Congressman Dan Crenshaw tweeted the blame for the outages on the state’s reliance on outlets, including wind turbines. “This is what happens when you force the grid to rely in part on wind as a power source. When weather conditions get bad as they did this week, intermittent renewable energy like wind isn’t there when you need it.”

According to The Electric Reliability Council of Texas, the state’s wind turbine production consists of 23% of the total electricity. This is more than double Washington’s usage at 8% of all electricity produced. If Washington’s wind turbines were to freeze over like they did in Texas, it would not have had as much of an impact in Washington.

Many years prior, the ERCOT refused to implement a weathorized system for their renewable energy. According to Newsweek, the frozen wind turbines could have been avoided with implementing a heating proponent or lubricants that colder states such as Wisconsin use to keep their wind turbines functional all year. Texas is a generally warm climate and rarely sees freezing cold temperatures, and therefore chose not to implement weathorized equipment.

Likewise, a combination of nuclear, coal, and gas power froze over and could not keep up with the increase in demand due to the freezing weather. According to The ERCOT, the state fell short of demand by 45,000 megawatts. This included 15,000 megawatts from wind and 30,000 megawatts from coal and gas. Both were responsible for the lack of power, but may have been prevented if the proper precautions were taken.

Furthermore, America has three main national power grids that connect communities and states. One covers the West side of the U.S., another covers the East side, and lastly, Texas is its independent grid. Since Texas is its own grid, it could not tap into other areas to match their increase in energy needs. According to the ERCOT, it controls 90% of the power resources in Texas and could not rely on outside sources for energy due to their isolation and wintery conditions. 

On the other hand, the majority of Washington’s electricity and energy production comes from hydroelectric power. According to the EIA, Washington’s Grand Coulee Dam is the largest power plant in the country and can power up to 4.2 million households annually.

This contradicts Texas’ energy sector that has the majority of their energy deriving from natural gas and wind, and only gets .5% of its energy from hydroelectric power, according to the EIA. Texas receives less rain per year and has less access to large rivers like the Coulumbia. Additionally, Texas has an abundance of natural gas located in the state and results in a more reliable source of energy within the state.

With all of this in mind, Washington State would surely see outages if the state was faced with a generational storm as seen in Texas. Yet, thanks to hydroelectric power the weather’s impact on living conditions would be far less catastrophic. Going forward, if Washington State contributed more of its energy towards wind turbines, then it would need to weatherize these machines to ensure that none will freeze over. 

COVID-19’s Effect on Sports

Feb. 19, 2020 – the last day that we stepped on a field together. 

It has now been almost 12 months since we last laced up our boots, but we finally resumed play on Feb. 9. We were given a second chance to play the game that we love, for after what felt like an eternity away from my teammates.

Unlike Feb. 2020, this year looks very different. Every player is required to wear masks; players aren’t allowed to socialize outside of practice and social distancing is a part of our daily lives. Yet, with a different appearance to the world’s most beautiful game, on the field, it never changed. 

I still love this game just as much if not more. It has done so much for me over the years and I will do whatever it takes to compete on the field every day.

My teammates all seemed to share this opinion and on the first day of practice, you could not see the faces of each teammate, but you could tell that they were smiling from ear to ear. After all the strenuous and annoying suspension of Pierce College athletics, the team had never been more ecstatic to compete. We had 12 months of energy and passion balled up inside waiting to be poured out on the soccer field. 

Playing for Pierce College’s men’s soccer program has been one of the most enriching experiences of my young adult life. It has brought me new friends, new possibilities and a chance to play at the collegiate level. Yet all of that would be put on hold when the Covid-19 pandemic took over all of our lives.

Back in February of last year, the team was in good spirits and met for the first time since Nov. 2019. We had a new class of recruits to build upon a strong list of returning players, who represented essential leadership going forward into a new season later that year. 

The previous season ended with a devastating 1-0 defeat in the first round of the NWAC playoffs. We were left with a bitter taste in our mouths and knew we had to push ourselves to the maximum during the off-season.

Consequently, our off-season was postponed when all Pierce College athletics were suspended in March 2020. This was a hard pill to swallow as the opportunity to strive as a program was stripped away from us. The team could no longer meet in person, workout together, or even hang out outside of practice, we were deprived of the opportunity to play the sport that we loved.

Although, this didn’t stop us from persevering through the separation of players, as we engaged in individual workouts and training sessions. Our coaches required us to download and participate in a virtual training app called Techne Futbol. 

We were required to complete five hours of training sessions each week, as the app would track our minutes. This created a competitive atmosphere between the players who wanted to improve the most, but it lacked accountability.

Fast-forwarding throughout the off-season, our start-up date continued to be pushed back further and further. We were originally told April, then July, then August, then December, and finally January.

The team continued to get our hopes up for a return to play, but our hopes were crushed every few months. It was hard to gauge when we had to turn on the jets and train hard for the season and created an emotionally draining process that left us feeling grim. Yet, when given the first opportunity to return to the field, we took it, even if that meant wearing a mask knowing that we were healthy.

From now until the end of the season we are required to wear masks at all times, from when we step out of our cars until we leave. I have been wearing masks for months now and have become accustomed to wearing them in indoor places, but never while running outside. The majority of us aren’t in game shape going into the first weeks of training and wearing a mask while running only makes these matters worse. 

I am all for taking priority in players’ health, but it can’t be doubted that masks bring performance complications and hinder the amount of oxygen that we take in. According to our Athletic Director Duncan Stevenson, our state government and the NWAC are moving forward in hopes of not wearing masks during games, which would be applauded by players who on average run seven miles per match.

Our current safety protocols include filling out a health check form every day that we meet, temperature checks before entering the field, and applying hand sanitizer before each competition. These protocols may cause extra pain and add to more things to remember daily, but they have the best interest of players in mind. 

The thing that I will miss most is having fans at every game. Seeing my friends, family, and fellow students at each game adds to the motivation and competitive atmosphere. My parents never missed a game last year and were disappointed by the news, and I’m sure that they still find some way to watch my games. For everyone else, our games will be streamed online which expands our outreach but takes away the in-person spark that fans fuel you with as a player.

This season is unlike any other season, but I will trade Covid-19 protocols any day of the week if it gave me the opportunity to step foot on the soccer field one last time. All I can ask for is an opportunity to prove myself as a player and a man, thankfully I got the opportunity this winter. 

Is Cancel Culture Striking Fairly?

On March 2, Dr. Seuss’s birthday, Dr. Seuss Enterprises announced on their website that they would stop the printing of 6 of their books. The statement listed: And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street (1937), If I Ran the Zoo (1950), McElligot’s Pool (1947), On Beyond Zebra! (1955), Scrambled Eggs Super! (1953), and The Cat’s Quizzer (1976) as the titles being discontinued.

“We are committed to action,” Dr. Seuss Enterprises stated. “These books portray people in ways that are hurtful and wrong.” 

The decision to stop publication and licensing for the 6 books was made last year after Dr. Seuss Enterprises worked with advisors who evaluated the titles. Much of the public has opinions either for or against the decision, and it seems Dr. Seuss Enterprises is not making any further comments about their statement or actions. This leaves the rest of us to wonder if the right decision was made.

The 6 books that have ceased publication and licensing.

The idea of “Cancel Culture”, as it has come to be known, is slowly sifting through many established franchises and either removing them or slapping a disclaimer on them. The timing seems to be appropriate for some and not for others. The looming question is if cancel culture is being fair about its judgment as well as its motivations.

Protecting the minds of children seems to be the priority, but what can be gained by hiding the history of the culture from them in literary form or in any other form for that matter? 

There are many books which are considered classics such as Huckleberry Finn written by American Author Mark Twain in 1884, in which the n-word is used multiple times portraying a historically accurate picture of the cultural behavior at the time.

If the goal is looking seriously into books branded as offensive and removing them, then school curriculums could begin shifting in a different direction where the history on those pages could be lost for good. Touching the surface of social issues could be a temporary solution and good conversation starter by cancel culture. Yet there is still real evidence of racism in the world which seems to have no answer.

Ravi Zacharias the late christian apologist and author said to a question posed by an anonymous news reporter about moral ethics at an open forum, “The reason we are against racism is because a person’s race is sacred. A person’s ethnicity is sacred. You cannot violate it. My race is sacred; your race is sacred; I dare not violate it.”

To take a stand against violations such as racism would be a continuous effort by all in society, and using examples of such would have a beneficial effect. What the public considers before giving an opinion about any social issue is of great importance to the structure of society. Merely picking what to be upset about is the answer for continued discord.

All of the books discontinued by Dr. Seuss Enterprises have various cultures being represented in an unflattering way.

Some of the illustrations are clearly evidence of the cultural norm at the time, while others are disturbing, such as the depiction of black people resembling monkeys in If I Ran the Zoo.

A collage including examples of Seuss’ racist imagery.

Any and all races have a right to feel some offense, and yet there is something about certain minorities not being considered people at certain historical times that keeps alluding the present social mentality. The heart of the issue seems to be based on doing the right thing and the focus is lost when people are told what to be angry about.

Co-Authors of On the Perpetuation of Ignorance Dr. Steven Shepherd and Dr. Aaron C. Kay published in Journal of Personality and Social Psychology wrote, “Individuals are often confronted with information that they do not know how to comprehend or evaluate, even though this information can be of critical importance to the self (or society as a whole).” 

Believing in the feelings of the culture seems to be an easy sell for all sides of the issues, but then arises a more prominent issue of missing the point. There are those frustrated with the facts not being taken into consideration before making a decision that can steer the culture down into the mire.

Many have taken to buying the remaining prints of the books canceled by Dr. Seuss Enterprises and have started selling them online. Some prices start at around $200 while others are going for up to around $1900.

Does the action of profiting from a social issue such as racism speak louder as a cultural norm than cancel culture? Again, the motivation of discontinuing any trace of history is key to understanding and learning to grow from past errors.

“Ceasing sales of these books is only part of our commitment,” Dr. Seuss Enterprises stated. The statement by Dr. Seuss Enterprises went on to say they will ensure their product will represent and support all communities and families.

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