Weird Places in Washington

May 10, 2021

As summer draws near, many students may be wondering how to enjoy their summer break. Thankfully, Washington state is full of all sorts of odd places ripe for exploring. So whether you’re looking to take an in-state trip during the summer or you’re just looking to add to your bucket list, check out some of Washington’s weirdest places.

Lyn Topinka – Courtesy Photo
  1. The Twin Sisters, Touchet.

If you’re a fan of local hiking as well as bizarre, natural scenery, then the Twin Sisters Rock in Touchet is the place. These stone pillars are the remnants of the last ice age over 12,000-15,000 years ago, and the erosion of a giant flood carved out these pillars. The natives of Walla Walla, however, have a local legend for their origins. 

 

“Coyote fell in love with three sisters who were catching salmon in the river. A notorious trickster, Coyote watched the sisters by day and destroyed their traps by night. After several days Coyote saw the sisters crying because they were starving for fish. He promised to build them a new trap if they would become his wives. The sisters consented and Coyote kept his promise. For many years they lived happily, but after a while, he became jealous of them. Using his powers, Coyote turned two of the sisters into stone pillars, and the third one into a cave downriver. He then turned himself into a rock so he could watch over them forever,” wrote Jamie Hale, a former hiker of this trail and a writer for The Oregonian

Welcome to Monte Cristo
Juliestge – Courtesy Photo

2. Monte Cristo Ghost Town, Snohomish.

We share our state with a vast expanse of wilderness and land steeped with history, so it’s no surprise there’s a town or two that’s been lost to time. Ghost Towns of Washington explains that Monte Cristo was once a bustling mining town in the late 1800s, but by 1920 the mines had dried up and the town was abandoned. Visitors can find remnants of the town’s heyday lying about, including old welcome signs, broken railways and homes now turned into shacks after years of disrepair. 

Carol M. Highsmith – Courtesy Photo

3. The Fremont Troll, Seattle

While this journey is a little closer to home, you may be surprised to find this hulking beast lingering beneath the Aurora Bridge in Fremont. Artists Steve Badanes, Will Martin, Donna Walter and Ross Whitehead created this 5.5 meter sculpture in 1990. The concrete and wire troll holds a Volkswagen Beetle in its hand, almost as if it snatched the car from the highway above. 

Photo via Seattle Pinball Museum

4. Seattle Pinball Museum, Seattle.

The Seattle Pinball Museum isn’t exactly a niche oddity, but it’s a place that’s perfect for kids, old school arcade fans and of course, pinball connoisseurs. The Seattle Pinball Museum boasts a wide array of pinball machines from all the way back to the 1930s and they aren’t just for show either, for a $15 admission fee you can play all you want.

Kyla Raygor

5. Hobbit Hut, Port Orchard.

Here’s a destination for botanists and fantasy fans alike. Located right behind the Brother’s Greenhouse in Port Orchard, this “Lord of the Rings” inspired Hobbit House can be ventured inside and comes complete with a working stone fireplace and circular doors and windows.

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